The best 5 books of the 21st century

The best books of the 21st century – what are they? “Evaluating the literary heritage of the century 18 years after its inception is something strange,” writes Vulture, but suggests starting to select the best works now. Journalists conducted a survey among leading book critics, writers, and readers, which resulted in the Top 100 best books of the 21st century. I suggest you evaluate our list of the most popular books of the 21st century. Mark in it those that have already read, and make personal book plans for future reading.

The Last Samurai by Helen DeWitt

The Last Samurai by Helen DeWitt

An unusual novel about the love to books, parenting and happiness. Sibylla, a single mother, earns a living by herself and her son by reprinting old books. At this time, her three-year-old son learns to play the piano and proceeds to study the Greek language. Then go Hebrew, Arabic and Japanese, aerodynamics and solid state physics. But more than anything, little Ludo wants to find out who his father is. When will mom make this knowledge available?

The Corrections by Jonathan Franzen

The Corrections by Jonathan Franzen

A great American novel in which there is everything: the relationship between children and parents, husband and wife, depression and loneliness, joy, and sorrow. It’s not without reason that Franzen is called “American Leo Tolstoy”: through the story of one large Lambert family from the Midwest, he shows us the America of the 1990s with its external well-being and increased internal anxiety. And when the family, where everything seems to be doing just that spoiling each other’s lives, nevertheless gathers at the Christmas table, we sigh: just like ours. There are no happy families, each has its own long and not always cloudless story.

Freedom by Jonathan Franzen

Freedom by Jonathan Franzen

The book “Freedom” by the American prose writer Jonathan Franzen – the second volume of the family saga “The Corrections”, published in the 1990s. If the “The Corrections” tells about the generation of young people of the eighties, then “Freedom” tells about them, only forty-five years old, owners of husbands and wives, children, and some life outcomes. A long story about the first crisis, which all heroes live without exception, in Franzen is interspersed with a description of “typical American life”, the September 11 explosion, and even global warming issues.

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

Never Let Me Go by Kazuo Ishiguro

“Never Let Me Go,” the famous psychological novel by Kazuo Ishiguro, became the basis for the film of the same name with Keira Knightley. Behind the fictitious story of a boarding school, where all pupils are clones specially raised for donation, there is a piercing thought shivering about the absolute acceptance of fate. The experiment of a woman who wanted to prove that even a clone has a soul failed at the state level. But at the human level, it fully justified itself. The story of three such experimental people, Ruth, Katie and Tommy, proves this. Knowing what they live for, they continue living. A story that penetrates the very heart involuntarily makes us think about the meaning of our own lives.

Neapolitan Quartet by Elena Ferrante

My Brilliant Friend by Elena Ferrante

Elena Ferrante, the author of a world-famous novel cycle, knows how to finish every part of it in such a way that I want to immediately take up the next. It’s like a series, only in books is the Neapolitan Quartet. In the first book, the novel “My Brilliant Friend”, the two heroines promised each other to get rich and break free from the stuffy captivity of their origin, the enchanted circle of the quarter, and its cruel customs. Each of them implements this plan – as it knows how and considers it necessary. Diligent Elena in the second book, “The Story of a New Name” continues, and Lila becomes Signora Karacci. In the third part, the novel “Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay”, Elena finally finds herself, her “I”, leaves the shadow of her friend Lila and starts playing her own melody, gaining confidence with each new note.

The events in the final, fourth part (“The Story of the Lost Child”) are rushing like crazy, days are replacing each other. In one book, friends manage to jump from confident maturity into old age. Elena and Lila give birth to their baby girls almost simultaneously, which brings them very close together. Sworn friends now understand who they are for each other, and do not try to change it. Lila takes on the role of the unspoken leader of the quarter, removing the eternal Solaras from this post. Lenu is at the peak of her writing career, but lives alone with three children in her childhood quarter – this is her conscious choice. A precarious disaster breaks the delicate balance. Misfortunes seem to stick to Lila, proving to others and herself that she is cursed.

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